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Powerhouse, Lyon Mountain Mine.
Photos taken in August 2011 by CandyCat13
Lyon Mountain Mine, Clinton County.  This was the site of an old iron mine on the edge of Lyon Mountain. It was started in 1871 by the Bethlehem Steel Company and produced 5,000,000 tons of ore between it's opening and 1919, after 1903 it was owned by the Chateaugay Ore & Iron Company. It was said that it was some of the finest ore in the world and some of it was even used on the Golden Gate Bridge.  162 men died in this mine over the years.  The mine was closed in 1967.
Good link on the history and technical info on the Lyon Mountain Mine.
Link from Infiltration 'Zine with lots more picks.
Slideshow showing some photos from when the mine was functioning.
You can buy a book about Lyon Mountain Miners.
More external picks and photos of the village and mountains, etc (see page 2 on that site also).
Candycat13 writes "Since moving here in 1995 this has been one of my 'obsessions'. I have been to the Lyon Mt museum (dragging my husband w/ me) and fully recommend it to anyone who attempts a visit to the mine first. They have a wealth of info and a remarkable ability to make you understand and feel what these miners and their families went thru. Many of the volunteers are the relatives of a former miners. The mine remnants are open if you dare to go. I absolutely love this place!!! I have over 70 picks of the mines works inside and out. I can find my around there in the dark (except for the lower stages...Even light does not penetrate that far...I am brave ..but not that BRAVE.) I don't know why more people don't go and enjoy the 'air'.
Just a note... there are a few black, bottomless holes.. don't go traipsing around in the first building w/out a good light."
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More pictures from the Lyon Mountain Mine.  Old loading spot.


Blast furnace.


Taken from the fifth floor.
Photos taken in August 2011 by CandyCat13
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More, from inside one of the Lyon Mountain Mine buildings.
Photos taken in August 2011 by CandyCat13
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More exterior photos of the mine buildings.
Photos taken in August 2011 by CandyCat13
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Date 01/12.  Photos by CharlieB.
First Baptist church on North Chapel St. in Gowanda, near the border of Erie and Cattaragaus counties.  Of note - a sign in a nearby village mentions that it is 926 feet above sea level.
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Date 01/12.  Photos by CharlieB.
More photos of the First Baptist church.
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Taken on 01/24/12
The front of the old Bomax building, State Route 12F (Coffeen Street), Watertown, Jefferson County.  The company began in October 1962 and manufactured sub-fractional horsepower motors, C-frames, shaded pole motors, AC & electric motors; blowers and fans and at one time employed around fifty workers, but closed in 2004. 
In the late 80's the webmaster toured this facility, having to don cleanroom equipment for the tour.  It was an incredibly high tech firm.
  But in the early 1990's chlorinated solvents, used to clean the motors they manufactured, were found by the DEC leeching into the soil and groundwater, having been dumped into the septic tank system through the floor drains and then later leaking into the soil surrounding the septic system.  It is listed as one of New York State's inactive hazardous-waste disposal sites.
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Comments from visitors:
Scannerman sent pictures of the demolition of the old Bomax facility, dated June 28th, 2013.
 





Taken on 01/24/12
Side view of the Bomax building.  Various trucks were parked at the other end, perhaps it is being worked on but it sure doesn't look like it.  It's open from one side to the other, with broken windows and missing doors, and there are many rumors that homeless and wild animals have been seen inside. 
From the now-defunct website - "Bomax, Inc., (Bomax) began operations in 1962 as a result of the entrepreneurial efforts of Robert G. Marzolf and Max E. Lautner. After seven years of steady growth as a closely held business Bomax was merged with Gould, Inc. on April 30, 1969. Bomax continued to grow as the Electric Motor Division of Gould manufacturing in excess of 30,000 motors a day during the latter part of the 1970's. In 1989, D'Amico, Christie and Gomez purchased the Bomax facility and began manufacturing motors with substantially the same personnel as with its predecessors. As a result of insufficient capital Bomax was placed on the sale block once again and in 1992 the D'Amico, Christie and Gomez ownership was succeeded by Fernand Fournier, an entrepreneur in several other non-related ventures. In June 2002, the company was sold to Thomas Dardaris, a previous partner with Mr. Fournier.
Bomax has focused on product quality and customer service as the mechanisms to regain the reputation created by our original founders some thirty years ago. Recognizing we are in a mature industry with minimal dynamics we believe we can earn our way back into the good graces of the customers that we successfully served in the past, as well as attracting new entrepreneurs developing new applications for our products.
Bomax is the only sub-fractional horsepower electric motor manufacturer with in-house capabilities of plastic injection molding, die casting, shaft manufacturing and rotor casting. The in-house manufacture of component parts results in design flexibility and production scheduling to meet stringent customer specifications and deliveries. Additionally, it allows us to control the quality aspect of all the component parts that go into our motors.
In 1997, Bomax purchased its manufacturing facility to secure its right to continue its objective of sustained growth and profitable operations. The ownership of Bomax is committed to continue making investments in people and equipment, and to provide the necessary resources to obtain these objectives." 
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County Route 15, about a mile west of Plessis, Jefferson County - house.
Photos taken in February 2012 by
Scannerman
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