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Date taken - October 2009.  Photo by Charles B.
Abandoned Delaware and Hudson train terminal in Rouses Point, NY, built in 1889. Charles writes: "Hillary Clinton, then our senator, secured $750,000 for our village to restore it. We are just awaiting a couple of contractors getting free time. Note the turrets and Victorian look. Current thought is leaning towards turning the terminal into a village historical museum." 
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There are also a few more pics on page 40 and the water tower on page 58.

Date taken - October 2009.  Photo by Charles B.
Close-up of the front.
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Historical Marker
The grounds were formally a maze of train tracks. They have all been removed.

Date taken - October 2009.  Photo by Charles B.
Close-up of an interesting part of the structure.
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CharlesB writes additionally; "It is an established fact that President James Monroe spent a day in Rouses Point and saw the location as strategic to U.S. border defense. He suggested that a large brick and mortar fort be built there - the future Fort Montgomery.
 

Date taken - October 2009.  Photo by Charles B.
Train Roundhouse.
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Date taken - October 2009.  Photo by Charles B.
Behind one of the doors of the roundhouse.
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Date taken - October 2009.  Photo by Charles B.
Building for washing down railway cars by hose, etc.
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Comments from visitors:
Kabs writes: "The roundhouse wasn't built for hosing anything down. In fact, most railroads, the D&H included, didn't bother to wash their steam locomotives. Every so often, maybe they'd go over them with a mop soaked in kerosene to make them shine, but that's about it. Roundhouses were built in the steam era as a way to store and maintain the locomotives, as well as repair and prepare them for their next trips. Other buildings on the site would be a coach shop, which was used to repair passenger stock, a coaling tower which was used for fuel, water tower for water, and in some cases a freight house where less than carload items were sorted and shipped out."
Russ N. writes: "And the reason that so many roundhouses are now abandoned is that diesel engines need much much less repair than do steam engines. When the steam engines went away, so did the roundhouses.
I have some photos of the roundhouse in Watertown: http://www.flickr.com/photos/russnelson/sets/72157608138338285/ There's also a ton of information on roundhouses in New York State: http://www.railroad.net/forums/viewtopic.php?f=128&t=68802&st=0&sk=t&sd=a&start=150

Date taken - October 2009.  Photo by Charles B.
Small building for holding freight. 
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Comments from visitors:
On 7/18/13 Jim Leggett writes: "This building was used for tools and train parts, which supplied the Car Dept and Roundhouse."

Date taken - October 2009.  Photo by Charles B.
Inside building for hosing down trains.
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Date taken - October 2009.  Photo by Charles B.
Train turntable adjacent to roundhouse. Could send engines to different roundhouse bays, or spin an engine towards Malone, Canada, Vermont, or Plattsburgh. 
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Date taken - October 2009.  Photo by Charles B.
Closer look at the mechanism gives you an idea of how turntable worked.
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Date taken - August 2009.  Photo by Charles B.
Fort Montgomery, Rouses Point, NY.
Wikipedia Entry.
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Date taken - August 2009.  Photo by Charles B.
Another view of this Civil War era masonry fort that has not been garrisoned in over 100 years.
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Date taken - August 2009.  Photo by Charles B.
Part of it was destroyed during the Great Depression to obtain stones to form the base of a new bridge across Lake Champlain.  CharlesB writes that it has a fascinating story.
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Date taken - August 2009.  Photo by Charles B.
A different angle.  All ordinance has been removed - cannons, etc.
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Date taken - August 2009.  Photo by Charles B.
CharlesB, the photographer, writes that "It is now on NY State's list of places to preserve or rebuild."
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Date taken - August 2009.  Photo by Charles B.
Inside Fort Montgomery.
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Date taken - Summer 2007.  Photo by Charles B.
This small farm is just off Route 5 in Clarence Hollow, Erie County, NY.  CharlesB says that no one has lived in this house for at least three years.
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Date taken - Summer 2007.  Photo by Charles B.
Newer rope, old barn and silo.
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Are there any old abandoned structures that you'd like to see here, then send me directions!  Or take a couple shots and send them to me.  Is there any additional info you can provide on any of these buildings?  Also send me any questions, comments, or corrections by clicking here.

 


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