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Taken in March '09 by Hope M. of Perceptionphotography.biz
Theresa, Main Street, old garage.  Hope writes that "It looks like an old garage in its most recent life, the presence of the cupola makes me think it has been repurposed from house or ?"
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Comments from visitors:
Gerald D. writes: "Was originally a home and later it served as a Sanitarium for contagious disease. Much later it was storage for hardware supply that operated from added wing on right. Now defunct."
Howard S. writes: "Formally the Ken Brown and sons John Deere dealership, then became a sometimes open hardware store, it is now closed and used for storage."

Taken in March '09 by Hope M. of Perceptionphotography.biz
On Miller Road, off from Route 12 between Gunn's Corners and Depauville, ruins of a barn
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Comments from visitors:
Derryl J. writes: "Just wondering if the barn belonged to the Millers, Bonaparte and Rosa and son, Frank, my ancestors. They farmed there from the 1840s to the early 1900s."

Taken on 05/07/09
Mill ruins in Glen Park, Route 12E/Route 190, along the Black River
A website visitor sent me the following three beautiful shots that her and her husband took while exploring.  I snapped the above photo from the road for perspective on the following photos (amazing how you can drive by something a thousand times and never notice it).  For a lot more photos click this other OABONNY page.
These are the remains of the C.R. Remington and Sons Paper Company's paper and pulp mill.  Sometime between 1884 and 1893 C.R. Remington and his family incorporated a paper mill business, with a capital of $225,000.  They then had constructed a dam up across the Black River at Glen Park (210 feet long with 13 gates), built the above paper mill and another one further down the river.  This mill was completed on January 1st, 1889.  On March 1st, 1891 the machinery in the mill was shut down for repairs and high water almost completely destroyed the mill; scattered equipment and collapsed the roof and some of the walls. The collapse also injured one man and killed another; John Murphy, aged 65 or 68.  Damage was estimated at about $50,000 to $75,000 and would take four months to repair (thanks to Anita for some of the above research and for sending us more docs to search through).
Milo L. Cleveland and his company built the mill for Remington, Cleveland's company also built the Opera House, The Elks Building, and the former Cleveland Building in Watertown.
After eighteen years of operation the mill was sold to the International Paper Company in 1899.
For more info about Glen Park go here.
For a photo of the remains of the old Glen Park Bridge over to the amusement park go to this page.
For a lot more photos click this other OABONNY page.
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This is a photo of the mill as it looked when it was operating.


Satellite photo of the ruins (from Google Earth)

Comments from visitors:
On 12/11/12 Derryl R. Johnson writes "My Great-great grandfather was John Murphy who was killed in the unfortunate accident in 1891. For a full account of this tragic accident, visit the Watertown Daily Times archives of March 2, 1891, titled 'A Big Pulp Mill in Ruins.'"

Taken on the first weekend of 05/09 by Heather & Corey H.
Mill ruins in Glen Park, Route 12E, along the Black River
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The two following aerial photos were taken by the webmaster from the backseat of a Piper Cub, while on a photography flight with a friend:


Taken on 11/18/09
For a lot more photos click this other OABONNY page.


Taken on the first weekend of 05/09 by Heather & Corey H.
A Webmaster Favorite

Mill ruins in Glen Park, Route 12E, along the Black River
For a lot more photos click this other OABONNY page.
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Comments from visitors:
Heather H. writes "The angle makes it look more like ancient Greek ruins than some modern rock structure."

Artwork using this photo can be found on this page.

Taken on the first weekend of 05/09 by Heather & Corey H.
Mill ruins in Glen Park, Route 12E, along the Black River
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Comments from visitors:
Here's another photo, this time by Aaron Hall, he writes: "Thanks for those mill pics. I had to go check that out for myself, I've been by there 1000 times and had never thought to check that out."  Here's the link to his original pic.


Taken the first weekend of May '09 by Mike & Dawn M
The abandoned Mary McClellan Hospital, Cambridge NY (NE of Albany, about 30 miles east of Saratoga)
Mike and Dawn write that it's an amazing site of 124 acres, and was a 74 bed hospital (built in 1917, the "gift" of a successful local "son" and named after his mother), boiler house, administrative offices, and  Nightingale Hall, a nursing dormitory built in 1922. An amazing site with an amazing history. There were still dishes in the sink of the kitchen and is a heli-pad where choppers would land to transport critical patients to more progressive medical centers. There is an senior residence that was abandoned as recently as last year; the beds are still made as if waiting for someone to come sleep in them, however the cactus in the lobby is in desperate need of water. Currently owned by Woodcock Realty, which went bankrupt before it could be returned to it's former glory.
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Photo taken of the hospital from Florence Nightingale Hall in 1943 by Peggy Allen, a nursing student

Comments from visitors:
Raema S M writes: "I am a graduate of MMC school of nursing 1967, I recently went to Cambridge to rekindle some old memories along with another grad. from North Carolina. We were quite taken back by the condition of Florence Nightengale Residence, as we looked in the window we could note believe how a beautiful and once charming building could have been in such disrepair. We are very saddened to know that it was not closed up properly after its retirement and was left to ruin Its disheartening to see a ounce stately and elegant building in such a state. We only wish someone had cared enough and respected it enough to close it properly until it could have been sold. There is wonderful history and many caring nurses who have passed through its doors, it was by far the best program for LPN'S."

Taken the first weekend of May '09 by Mike & Dawn M
The abandoned Mary McClellan Hospital, Cambridge NY (NE of Albany, about 30 miles east of Saratoga)
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Some research from Mike and Dawn; "Edwin McClellan who grew up in Washington County and loved the town of Cambridge graduated from Yale in 1884 as a pharmacist. He was involved with the morphine imports with China in the early 1900's and came up with the formula for Doan's Pills. This made him a very wealthy man and because Cambridge was a farming town, pride did not come with money so he gave it back to the community. He was even thoughtful enough to erect this hospital up in the hills so as not to disrupt the agriculture and economics of the town. I could not understand why there are tennis courts up there and have since learned that he put them there to lure city doctors to the hospital. Apparently there was no golf back then.....tennis was the doctor game. They started construction in 1917 and January of 1919 dedicated the hospital in memory of his mother, Mary McClellan. Edwin's brother Robert also became a wealthy man and in 1922 built and dedicated the nursing student dormitory in the back of the hospital, Florence Nightingale Hall. They had a contract with Skidmore and NYC colleges for nurses to do there clinical training there...again trying to entice people from the city. Edwin died only five years after the hospital was built. It closed six years ago after filing for bankruptcy. There is a heliport there but we learned that because they could never afford state of the art equipment they often had to run patients to Albany Medical Center or Vermont hospitals as they did not have the facilities. The Mary McClellan Guest Home which was assisted living for dementia patients closed January of 2008. Woodcock Estates had bought the property but only had that small building open, which was built in the 70's. They too went bankrupt. So there it sits...........dishes in the sink, Monopoly game on the table........from the hospital, to the ER, to the assisted living........they left everything, walked out and closed the door.
"

Taken the first weekend of May '09 by Mike & Dawn M
The abandoned Mary McClellan Hospital, Cambridge NY (NE of Albany, about 30 miles east of Saratoga)
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Taken the first weekend of May '09 by Mike & Dawn M
The abandoned Mary McClellan Hospital, Cambridge NY (NE of Albany, about 30 miles east of Saratoga)
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Comments from visitors:
Linda B. writes "I too was a graduate from Mary McClellan...1969..I went back for one reunion with my class. The view from the top of our nursing residence brings back fond memories because the summer before we graduated we went up there with blankets off our beds to sunbathe, Little did we know that the warm tar from the roof would get all over them. we hid them in our closets but were found by the cleaning staff as the roof was |OFF LIMITS...Boy did we get in trouble. I drove up there ever year till just after it closed on my way to the car show in Bennington Vermont. I was so sad to see it empty and going down hill. Our residence had such beautiful architectural detail. I had a lot of good memories there and yes....it was the best |LPN school in the state. I am still working at my hospital in my 41st year there.....Thanks for the pics...and the jog down memory lane."
Gerri M. B. writes "I graduated from Mary McClellan School of Nursing in 1976. Such an excellent nursing education and wonderful program. It saddens me to see the once so full of life and laughter abandoned and in ruin. Shirley Mulligan was DON and Mrs. Bye was our house mother. I would love further updates if anyone has any. Thank you for sharing these photos!"
Deborah L. writes "I graduated from MMc. 1976. I too remember Mrs Mulligan. I spent many weekends alone there because I lived on Long Island and had no transportation. The woods behind the school was full of lilly of the Valley in the spring and it was beautiful. Winter was just as nice, however that hill was terrible to get up! I am thankful for a great education in nursing MMc provided a wonderful foundation to continue my education on."
On 1/17/12 Deanna Moon writes "Born here Aug. 20, 1962.  I was born here on Aug. 20, 1962 to a 16 year old girl. I was put up for adoption. If anyone has any information about anyone who worked there at that time I would greatly appreciate it. I have been searching for my birth mother for at least 25 years, with no luck. So I am trying all avenues to reach her. Please, if you remember a 16 year old girl back then who gave birth or anyone who worked in the Maternity ward then, please send me an email..DMoon@hvc.rr.com. A funny thing is I became an LPN and never knew Mary McClellan Hospital was a nursing school!! I went to Boces for my LPN degree."
On 12/4/12 Marilyn Reinhold "Brought a tear to my eye to see the picture of FN Hall again. One of the best years of my life was spent at MMc. Such fond memories of sitting around in living room teaching each other to knit; stayed up late to see the Space launch; discovering "peach cobbler" at the hospital cafeteria; having to kneel to be sure our uniforms hit the floor for proper length; jumping into my 1969 VW bug, often before curfew to go "down street" to get hotdogs; driving to Bennington, Vt. with Kathy M. and also to Grandma Moses home with Pat M. and going to Shirley and John Mulligan's farm. She made hotdogs with bacon wrapped around them (another new way to eat a hotdog for me, the "city" girl :) She and John were so happy to show us the farm. I loved being in their home. Will never forget her big, old-fashioned wood burning stove...a great time being in a "real home" rather than the dorm. I am a 1969 graduate who also went to the reunion. A lovely time of renewing memories. Because Shirley May Mulligan went to college on Staten Island, which is where I was from then, she keeps in touch with me every Christmas with a card and newsletter. Hope to hear from her again this year, 2012. Would also enjoy hearing from any classmates, so I hope they print my email: Lynstar@comcast.net Will also never forget Mrs. Wilks when we lived in Troy, NY for few months. She is the one who inspired and encouraged me to go to Maria College (Albany NY) Thank You Mrs. Wilks for my "RN". Tried to find her to tell her how much she influenced my life. If anyone knows of her, please email me. I hold my time at MMc so very close to my heart and I believe God above directed me there to receive the blessing of a fine education and a most wonderful, happy year in my life."

Taken on 03/24/09
The remains of the Island Mill on Tannery Island, Carthage.  The smokestack in this pic stands alone, and is a short distance away from the old mill building behind it in this photo (see satellite photo below for orientation).  I could not take any closer photos of this because the Tannery Island is posted, I took this photo from Grape Island.  In the foreground, on the other island I took this photo from, you can see a grinding stone that was used to grind the wood used in papermaking.

Old photo of the area
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Comments from visitors:
Robert Pinkham writes "Here is a bit of information about the building prior to its closing a person was killed on the upper floor of the building the part he was killed on it is white if you have a current picture of it he fell over the railing and was impaled on an iron rod. I was told this story when I was about fifteen I am 29 it was told to me by a friends father who clamed that it was his great grandfather who met his fate there. The last time I was there there was much of the internal structure still recognizable."
Jack S. writes "Around 1960 Ruderman owned the island, several of the buildings were used as storage for his used machinery scrap business. At that time I had some scrap metal there. Stored were several water wheel turbines. Much of the papermill machinery was still there. Several water wheels connected to generators and beaters."
Poor's Island Papermill ruins
Jack S writes "This is a carthage grinder. It was used to grind pulpwood into wood pulp in a papermill. The 'rollers' that you see in the abandoned paper mill pictures were inside this castiron machine. Wood was loaded in the pockets as seen on the left, the door was closed and the lever pulled to actuate the hydraulic cylinder which forced the wood against the grind stone. Water was sprayed against the stone to keep the wood from burning. Wood and water mixed, came out the bottom and was called slush, this went through a series of screens to remove slivers, then to the beaters to make the fibers finer, then onto the paper machine. If only wood fiber was used it was a solid wood sheet; an example of that would be the old fashioned milk bottle caps. For other sheets it was mixed with other fibers, chemicals, dies, and waste paper."
On 03/23/12 Jack S. writes "The Crown Zellerback, now Metro paper in Carthage , J. P. Lewis paper mill and the T. B. Basselin 'Casidy mill" all had the same grinders."


For many more pictures of the old mill and structure ruins in this area, as well as maps and information - go back to this page.

Taken on 05/11/09
Here's another view from the mainland along the shore.

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Satellite photo showing location of the smokestack and building

Taken on 05/11/09
The old remaining mill on Tannery Island, Carthage.

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You can find some interior shots of this building posted by "The League if Extraordinary Ordinaries" - a local Urban Explorer's group page - the photos are here.

Taken on 05/11/09
The Deferiet St. Regis Paper Mill, being demolished.

Investors decided in December of 1901 to build the mill, with the hope of the high profit possible due to the high cost of was newsprint at the time. Plans were drawn up in March of '01 and construction began on June 9th of 1902. When finished it was, at the time, the largest mill in the area and was built to be the most modern papermill in the US. The walls were made of concrete, of which very few other buildings at the time were constructed of. The mill's daily production capacity was thirty tons of Manila paper and twenty-five tons of wood pulp, but it only needed to employ about seventy-five people (being paid $100 a day). A canal was built to divert water from the dam to the mill to counter low water levels during the summers, a significant engineering feat at the time. After sixteen years the company was bought out by an Ohio company and production was dropped to twenty-five tons a day, but the company invested heavily in the mill and the village of Deferiet. By 1922 the village was company-owned with fifteen hundred residents living in company-owned houses, but in the 60's the company sold the houses.  
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Taken on 05/11/09
The Deferiet St. Regis Mill, being demolished.

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Old photo of the mill during it's heyday.


Comments from visitors:
Martin H. writes: "Worked there during 1958 and 1959 as a third hand on paper machine and my father retired from there."

Taken on 05/11/09
The Deferiet St. Regis Mill, being demolished.

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Taken on 05/11/09
The Deferiet St. Regis Mill, being demolished.

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Taken on 05/11/09
The Deferiet St. Regis Mill, being demolished.

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Taken on 05/11/09
The Deferiet St. Regis Mill, being demolished.
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Taken on 05/11/09

The Deferiet St. Regis Mill, being demolished.

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Taken on 09/24/09

Dexter, tiny concrete building near the park/water area
The park and fishing area here is quite nice with a pavilion, dock, short trail, and exercise equipment.

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Comments from visitors:
Don writes: "Not sure if you've received any information regarding this structure, but it was a pumphouse. Before the island was cleared for Fish Island Park there were four concrete footers that the accompanying water tower stood on. At one time there was a mill across the street and there were five or six houses on the island."
On 5/2/13 Curiousone writes "Has anyone got pictures of the houses that used to be on Fish Island?"
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Are there any old abandoned structures that you'd like to see here, then send me directions!  Or take a couple shots and send them to me.  Is there any additional info you can provide on any of these buildings?  Also send me any questions, comments, or corrections by clicking here.

 

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